Viewing entries tagged
little kids dancing

A Peek At The Feria (Video) | The Weekly Letra

Comment

A Peek At The Feria (Video) | The Weekly Letra

Traditional festivals (ferias) take place in towns big and small across southern Spain during the springtime. Locals dress up, dance, sing, eat, and have A LOT of fun. There are the bigger ferias (those of Sevilla, Jerez...) and there are the smaller ferias (those of Sanlúcar, El Puerto...). These exclusive springtime ferias are unique to Andalucía, and each one has its very own encanto (charm). One of the great things about the feria is that there you get to see both professionals and everyday people dancing flamenco; some may not dance very well technically, but they dance from the heart.

Below you'll see a video of Samara and Rocío Carrrasco at this year's Feria del Caballo in Jerez along with pictures from a variety of ferias in Andalucía.

Keep Reading

Comment

Impossible For Me To Believe | The Weekly Letra

Comment

Impossible For Me To Believe | The Weekly Letra

I'm still in a bulerías mood as I prepare to head to Jerez for the Flamenco Tour in a couple of weeks. 

And so, today I have a video clip to share with you of a little girl from Jerez named Triana dancing bulerías (her signature dance of course) for Rafael Amargo. She starts off by singing the following letra then dances while her dad sings and plays guitar for her. You're going to love it.

From Veo Amanecer
Lya

Imposible me parece de creer,
que me enamoré de ti cuando solo te vi una vez,
y ahora te recuerdo y te recordaré,
como aquel bello gitano que me hizo enloquecer. 

Keep Reading

Comment

How Old is Too Old to Begin Dancing Flamenco? (and a Must-Watch video)

Comment

How Old is Too Old to Begin Dancing Flamenco? (and a Must-Watch video)

When is it too late to start learning flamenco? Find out below and watch a video of Mercedes Ruíz dancing as a little girl along with a bulerías clip from Carlos Saura's Flamenco Flamenco.

According to Mercedes Ruíz, "It's never too late do what you want to do." Sure, she began dancing flamenco at the age of four, but that doesn't mean the rest of us are doomed.

I began dancing flamenco at the age of twenty three, or was it twenty two? Pat began when she was sixty nine. Becky began when she was forty four. Many of the dancers I know began in their thirties, forties, fifties, and even sixties. Many danced at a young age then stopped for various reasons only to come back to it years later.

We can begin dancing flamenco at any age

And there is no 'retirement age' for flamenco dancing. We can leave it and come back. And we can continue dancing flamenco as long as we want to. This is something that I absolutely love about flamenco.

It is a dance for all ages.

Older flamenco dancers are in fact respected and honored. This is part of the flamenco culture. (See video clips below.)

A younger dancer may have different goals than an older dancer. And one's desires as a dancer may change over time, just as desires around all things in life will evolve.

But the bottom line is this,

Read More

Comment

Comment

Rumba | Viernes con una Letra

I am hearing Ada singing right now. And Ellie doing palmas. I am seeing Margot dancing. This is all happening in my mind.

And I am smiling.

They are my nieces.

Between Christmas and New Year's Eve the four of us found moments of time here and there to prepare for our show.

I guess it has become an annual thing, 

More on that along with a rumbas letra and a video of Estrella Morente.

Keep Reading

Comment

Day 2: Dance As If You Were in Class with Mercedes Holiday Challenge

2 Comments

Day 2: Dance As If You Were in Class with Mercedes Holiday Challenge

My niece is participating in the challenge with me. In part.

She loves flamenco and started taking regular classes this spring after taking a class with Ricardo in Santa Barbara.

“Do you want to do some of Mercedes’s exercises with me?” I asked her on Christmas Day.

She did.

She knew what to expect as she had sat through her class in Jerez a coupe of times. (My nieces spent some time with me and the group in Spain last spring, and Margot happily, patiently, and voluntarily sat through hours of class with Mercedes.)

“Are we going to do the one with the hands?” she asked me as she stretched her arms out imitating the exercise, this exercise.

Keep Reading

2 Comments

I Have to See You Cry | Viernes con una Letra

Comment

I Have to See You Cry | Viernes con una Letra

Today a tangos letra and a video of Jesús Méndez and Miguel Poveda.

You may recall last year when three little girls did fandangos.

A couple of weeks ago when I went to visit those girls Margot and Ada almost immediately started asking when we would get to do flamenco.  My spring visit there was so short that we didn't do any.  None at all.  Apparently they weren't going to let that happen again.  

Margot said she wanted to learn a new song and dance this time.  And she said she wanted it to be short since we were without a lot of time.

We did tangos.

And while I'm not really into vengeance, this letra was on my mind.  And it met Margot's requirement of being short.

Keep Reading

Comment

Viernes con una Letra | Sol

Comment

Viernes con una Letra | Sol

Ok, in honor of the beautiful sun we've been seeing here in Portland this week, here's the little fandangos coletilla. I taught it to my nieces in December. They were the cutest singing it, and Margot danced to it with a fan.

Quítate de sol que te quema
quítate del sol que te pone
la carita morena
Popular

Get out of the sun that burns you
Get out of the sun
that turns your little face brown
Popular

Ricardo, by the way, loves fandangos. Here is a falseta he set for me a couple of years ago...  He'll be here in less than two weeks! Como siempre, comments are invited and welcomed.  You may leave one below.

Comment

And Another Resolution

6 Comments

And Another Resolution

Ok, so I mentioned that I had another resolution, apart from the first one.  This one is harder to put into words, so I'm allowing for it to be something other than a concise written statement.  After all, soy artista, used to expressing myself in a variety of ways. This resolution has to do with my business, with respecting and honoring it.  It has to do with allowing for it to evolve as it needs to evolve.  It has to do with me providing the space and time to let this happen.  It has to do with allowing myself to have doubts and fears but viewing those with curiosity rather than interpreting them as signals to give up. 

¡Dejarlo todo, No!

You see, quite regularly, I think about quitting this all and just going back to working for someone else.  It is confusing.  And it kind of terrifies me.  Maybe I am not supposed to say that here, but it is the truth, and I am saying it.  It is not that I don't want to be here or that I don't love what I'm doing.  Noooo, not at all.  In fact, I have been doing some research and have discovered it is quite the opposite:

Keep Reading

6 Comments