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The things that happen in Cádiz | Viernes con una Letra

Here's an interpretation from Miguel Poveda of the popular Bulerías de Cádiz reflecting upon the current-day situation in Spain. Scroll down for an out-of-control amazing video of a live performance ¡que compás y gracia! with José Quevedo, Diego del Morao, El Londro, Luis Cantarote, and my (not real) boyfriend's real brother, Carlos Grilo.

Bulerías de Cai
¡Qué disparate!

Con el caray, caray, caray, 
éstas son las cosas que pasan en Cai,
que ni la hambre la vamos a sentir,
 
que mire usted que gracia tiene este país.

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Sleeping with Bulerías | Viernes con una Letra

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Sleeping with Bulerías | Viernes con una Letra

Below find a snippet of my journal from Jerez, a video of Mercedes Ruíz dancing bulerías, a letra por bulerías, and a short activity for you to do while watching the video.

October 30, 2013

I played bulerías to help me fall asleep during siesta time.

Bulerías with lots of palmas and jaleos of course.

Who does that?

Someone who is in Jerez I guess.

Someone who is in Jerez and  just can't get enoughIt's a good thing I'm going back.

I listened to one that I recorded at the peña last night.

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You Can't do Flamenco and Not do Jaleos

You can’t do flamenco and not do jaleos.  You just can’t. It can feel awkward at first, I know.  No te preocupes.  I have some ideas on how to become more comfortable with this whole jaleos thing.

First, a few and how to pronounce them:

como es eso  [coh-moh eh eh-so]

vamos allá  [vah-moh ah-yah]

que toma toma toma toma toma  [kay toh-mah...]

Here is a list of some common (& simpler) ones, along with some embarrassing admissions of accidentally giving them in English.  Oops.

I used to be afraid to give jaleos

I thought I would sound stupid.  I thought people would laugh at me.  But mostly, it just felt so unnatural.

But not anymore.

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A Show in Jerez on a Saturday Night

La Gitanería is having these Saturday night flamenco cante shows.  There was one last night.  It started at 10:30.  Only, it didn’t actually begin until 11:30, maybe even a bit later than that.  We didn’t even start walking there until after 11. As we came in we walked by Diego del Morao.  He was not performing, just hanging out...

The first set was excellent.  Two young guys, a singer and a guitarist.  Sorry, I don't know their names.  The first set also ended up being the only set.

It was one of those Jerez shows where most of the people in the audience are Jerezanos.

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The Accidental Jaleo...and a list of some common ones

We know that jaleos are words of encouragement to call out to the dancer, singer, guitarist,  to anyone participating really.

And flamenco is not flamenco without them.

So, below you'll find a list of a few common ones.

Every now and then this weird thing happens and a jaleo in English sneaks out of my mouth.

What in the world?!   I can't help it.  English is my first language, and it happens.

Like the time in class when I suddenly heard someone say enthusiastically, "This is!"  and quickly realized that someone was me.

Yep.  We still laugh about that one.

I guess the question is,  Is that still technically a jaleo?

I'm going to say yes because it was heart-felt and encouraging, and

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Emilio Has Some Answers (and soon he'll have even more)

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Emilio Has Some Answers (and soon he'll have even more)

An interview with flamenco dancer Emilio Ochando and a video:

I can't wait to ask Emilio a million things once he gets here.  I asked him some questions last year.  But I have so many more!  Like how did he get to be so good?  And who are his favorite dancers?  And what are his favorite practice techniques and strategies?

I know he has a lot to tell us.

So I warmed him up with a few quick questions the other day.  And here is what he had to say.

Qué debe saber la gente que quiere aprender a bailar flamenco? Deben saber que no deja de ser un arte y que ello te lleva a emociones.  Tambien le tienes que sumar la constancia y ganas.

What should people who want to learn flamenco know? They should know that it will never stop being an art and that it will bring up your emotions.  Also you need to be consistent and approach it with enthusiasm.

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What do you want from it?

Today's post is about flamenco workshops, the different types and the different skills you can gain from different types.

My friend Shyiang from Vancouver has taken LOTS of workshops (even some here in Portland, from Ricardo López)  She told me once that she would usually just learn the choreographies and then let them go.  Her friends would wonder what was wrong with her.  They would ask her how she could justify spending the money without even bothering to remember the choreography, without actually using it later.

The thing is, the experience itself was enough for her.

The experience itself made it worth it.

When attending a workshop, you, the student, get to choose.  You may choose to go home with a funky new piece, or you may just focus on being there, on the dancing and the learning and the soaking up of that flamenco essence in the moment.

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And Then, the Smiles

In the past weeks I've noticed something.  For those of you who've been reading, you know that I am trying to make this year all about noticing.

Anyway, in class I've seen people coming in with all kinds of expressions.

Many people wearing the kind of day, or week, they've had on their faces. Class gets going, and there are concentrated looks, which is exciting.

And then, the smiles.

I've been seeing lots of smiles!  

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I Used to Hate Bulerías (While Secretly Loving It)

My main obstacle to bulerías has always been fear, not trusting my instincts.  It's no different from my main obstacle in life.  It is what makes me so indecisive.  No wonder bulerías has always been so hard for me...I don't trust.  Wah! This realization was profound. In a moment I'll share with you some things I've come to know about bulerías…things that have made it easier, less scary to dance.  (There is also a Workshop coming up where we'll cover this in-depth...) The truth is, now I kind of can't get enough of bulerías.  It is not that the fear has been eradicated completely, but the excitement and fun usually push it off to the side now.  Gracias excitement and fun.

So, I used to haaaaate bulerías (while secretly loving it.)

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