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fandangos naturales

What Goes On During The Flamenco Tour & A Fandangos | The Weekly Letra

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What Goes On During The Flamenco Tour & A Fandangos | The Weekly Letra

Five days in, and the Flamenco Tour is well underway. I'll tell you a bit about that (and share photos) in a moment, but first, a fandangos letra for you...

There have been all kinds of shows going on here in Jerez. Below is a letra that we heard Alberto Sánchez, 'El Almendro' sing yesterday at the Peña La Bulería with José Manuel Alconchel accompanying him on guitar. They came straight from playing at Tabanco el Pasaje and were well warmed up. It was an intimate afternoon show in the front salon of the peña. We arrived early and got seats and drinks. It was a small but enthusiastic crowd, and everyone was there to enjoy and listen, except for one guy who kept talking who the guitarist stopped to lecture mid-show. 

And now for that letra,

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Fandangos Naturales | The Weekly Letra

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Fandangos Naturales | The Weekly Letra

Ever experienced pain and sorrow and struggled to truly feel into it even though you knew you needed to? Today's letra and video might be able to help with that. Below find a fandangos letra and a video of Rocío Márquez.

Fandangos

La pena grande que se llora
con las lágrimas se va;
la pena grande es la pena
que no se puede llorar;
esa no se va, se queda.

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Una Palmera | Viernes con una Letra

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Una Palmera | Viernes con una Letra

I am in Sevilla where the bells of the catederál keep ringing and the birds keep singing.  That was not meant to rhyme, it just did.  In Jerez there were lots of birds but not so many bells. And speaking of Jerez, last Saturday we went to hear José Carpio, "El Mijita," sing at a new little bar called Zoniquete.  I mean it when I say that the place was small.

It was verdaderamente íntimo.

We were on our way home from dinner.  Still on a high after our private show with Mercedes, Santiago Lara, and David Lagos earlier that evening.  Everyone was sleepy from the classes, the shows, from everything.  We could have gone home.  And some did.  But Cherie, Frieda, Stefani, and I decided to stop by the bar to see if anything was happening yet.

It was only 10:00, and there was nothing going on.  Except that the performers were there.  So we got something to drink and waited.  The show was supposedly set to start at 10:30.  Of course we knew it wouldn't start until well after.  Still, I figured I'd ask when the singing would begin.

Cuando llega la gente.

"When people get here."

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