Caballos at the Feria

Caballos at the Feria

I am very excited to be teaching Sevillanas again.  And, I am newly energized after recently having danced them at the Fería de Caballo in Jerez,  In fact, my time there inspired me to teach Sevillanas al estilo de Jerez.  Perhaps you're wondering what that means.  Perhaps you're worried about what that means.  Perhaps you're thinking, "Oh no, she's changing them AGAIN; not another new way!!!"  Perhaps you've never done Sevillanas, have no idea what they are and no idea what I'm talking about.

Whatever the case may be, I'm still excited.

The bottom line is that Sevillanas are fun.

Spontaneous Sevillanas at the Feria

Spontaneous Sevillanas at the Feria

They tend to feel safe to all students, beginning to advanced because of their set choreography. No need to think on the fly, just follow the steps (once you get them) and have fun.  And an important note: people dance them in Spain all of the time without really knowing the actual set steps.  They just drink their manzanilla and go for it.  They do what they know and make up the rest...but there is a hitch; they do it in compás.  And the compás will come, by listening and doing and listening some more, or maybe it's already there.  In any case, it is late, and I just wanted to get up a bit of basic Sevillanas info before going to bed.

Soooooooo, here you go:

A "normal" Sevillanas has four coplas (verses) meaning that when you dance with someone, you dance all four together to complete the song. Each copla has and introduction and three sections of cante.  Below I have included the steps for the first two coplas following this format.  (Coplas 3 and 4 coming soon.) Remember, there are many variations; this is just one...the one being taught in Saturday Sevillanas.  After studying for awhile, you'll likely come up with some variations of your own, olé!  Just be sure to do your pasadas always at the designated times if dancing with a partner!

1ª/Primera Copla Five sevillanas steps | Pasada Sevillanas step | Two golpes | Three marcajes (fwd) | Two golpes or Golpe-scoot | Vuelta | Pasada Sevillanas step | Four pasadas | Two golpes or Golpe-scoot Vuelta | Final

2ª/Segunda Copla Sevillanas step | Three marcajes (step/slide) | Two golpes or Golpe-scoot | Vuelta | Pasada Sevillanas step | Two golpes | Five waltz steps | Two golpes or Golpe-scoot | Vuelta | Pasada Sevillanas step | Two golpes | Seven steps walking | Two golpes or Golpe-scoot Vuelta | Final

Student Show Sevillanas at Abby's Table

Student Show Sevillanas at Abby's Table

Also, I would like to mention that Kasandra at Mozaíco Flamenco in Vancouver (where Oscar is!!!) has a fabulous post about this very subject.  I love everything she has to say:

About why it can be so beneficial to study Sevillanas as a foundation

About how good it is for the brain (Flamenco as brain exercise seems to come up at least once in every class around here; there's just no getting away from it!)

About the many things one learns that have nothing at all to do with dance - Unexpected Bonuses.

I'm very much looking forward to seeing some Sevillanas in action at the next Juerga...

Have something to say about Sevillanas?  How have they helped you as a dancer?  How do you like to dance them?  Do you like their predictability?  Is knowing when to come in the hardest part?  Leave a comment here.

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