Viewing entries tagged
José Carpio

How To Dance to a Cuplé (Part 5) | The Weekly Letra

Comment

How To Dance to a Cuplé (Part 5) | The Weekly Letra

You've heard many examples of different artists singing cuplés in the previous four posts. Now it's time to see how one dances to a cuplé, and I've got one of the best possible examples for you, Carmen Herrera. Following the video I'll talk about how to dance bulerías to a cuplé then share one of the songs you'll hear and its translation.

Let's begin by watching Carmen as she dances to the singing of father and sons Alfonso Carpio "Mijita," Alfonso Carpio "Mijita Hijo," and José Carpio "Mijita." They are at a juerga at Peña de la Bulería in Jerez. The video is queued to begin where Carmen starts dancing at 4 minutes 30 seconds (though I'm pretty sure you'll want to go back and watch the whole thing at some point.) Today's song begins about five minutes in. The guys share in the singing, and it's kind of impossible not to get excited watching the interplay between them. 

While you watch, notice how Carmen's dancing changes as the song progresses. Notice how she reacts to her three singers and where she puts her remates. Notice when she brings the energy up ...

Keep Reading

Comment

Una Palmera | Viernes con una Letra

2 Comments

Una Palmera | Viernes con una Letra

I am in Sevilla where the bells of the catederál keep ringing and the birds keep singing.  That was not meant to rhyme, it just did.  In Jerez there were lots of birds but not so many bells. And speaking of Jerez, last Saturday we went to hear José Carpio, "El Mijita," sing at a new little bar called Zoniquete.  I mean it when I say that the place was small.

It was verdaderamente íntimo.

We were on our way home from dinner.  Still on a high after our private show with Mercedes, Santiago Lara, and David Lagos earlier that evening.  Everyone was sleepy from the classes, the shows, from everything.  We could have gone home.  And some did.  But Cherie, Frieda, Stefani, and I decided to stop by the bar to see if anything was happening yet.

It was only 10:00, and there was nothing going on.  Except that the performers were there.  So we got something to drink and waited.  The show was supposedly set to start at 10:30.  Of course we knew it wouldn't start until well after.  Still, I figured I'd ask when the singing would begin.

Cuando llega la gente.

"When people get here."

Keep Reading

2 Comments